Bernie Sanders Response to CNN Reporter About the Gorsuch Nomination

Bernie Sanders Response to CNN Reporter About the Gorsuch Nomination

Senator Bernie Sanders makes a response to a CNN reporter, Jake Tapper, about the confirmation of Neil Gorsuch. Bernie Sanders, as many people may know, is vehemently opposed to the nomination of Neil Gorsuch to the US Supreme Court. Senator Sanders considers Gorsuch to be unsuitable to set on the highest court in the land.

Bernie Sanders goes on to point out that Gorsuch’s nomination is so crucial because this particular nominee has shown no interest in reversing the controversial Citizens United decision of the US Supreme Court. He then goes on to point out that this nomination is the most crucial to happen in years. It is a well-known fact that Senator Bernie Sanders regards the Citizens United decision as being one of the most incorrect and biased decisions ever made by the US Supreme Court.  He doesn’t believe, as most Americans, that corporations should have the same standing as people.  On this point, I could not more adamantly agree.

Tapper then brings up an old video of Bernie Sanders, from a couple of months from years ago, where the Senator makes a statement about how important it is to have a nine-member Supreme Court, not eight. If I remember correctly, Bernie Sanders made this comment when Republicans tried to hold up the nomination of Merrick Garland, President Obama’s nominee for the US Supreme Court. It was totally irrelevant for Jake Tapper to bring up this old interview because it has nothing to do with the present situation, and only serves to further obscure the point that Senator Sanders is trying to make.

Instead of getting offended, Bernie Sanders addresses Tapper’s issue as though it was valid with a statement saying he still believes that the US Supreme Court can only function with nine members, instead of eight. He goes on to reinstate that he is supposed to Neil Gorsuch because he is unqualified to sit on the Supreme Court. His deflection on Tapper’s attempt at subterfuge is brilliant.

Bernie Sanders is 100% correct, as he usually is, about this point of order in the U.S. Senate. He considers it to be unethical for the GOP majority leader, McConnell, to change the rules just because he is politically biased in favor of Gorsuch, and wants to see him confirmed for the US Supreme Court. It doesn’t matter to McConnell that Gorsuch is an unsuitable candidate. He is just playing the usual partisan political game that makes it nearly impossible for any piece of legislation or business to be conducted in Congress.

Bernie Sanders, like many people, think that the entire process of selecting a replacement for the deceased Antomin Scalia is extremely important and should be immune from political gamesmanship. Not to mention that Gorsuch is unqualified, not only because he was invasive during his confirmation hearing, but has made some rulings as a judge on the appeals court that have been not only controversial, but just plain wrong.

As usual, Bernie Sanders is advocating a very important position that concerns most Americans, or at least it should.

I was born on December 22, 1955, in a small Pennsylvania town named Corry. I was raised in Bear Lake, Pennsylvania. I graduated from Corry Area High School in 1973. After that, I attended Edinboro State College from 1977-79. I moved to Berkeley, California in 1980, in search of an independent life. In 2006, I graduated from Berkeley city College with two degrees, one in English and the other in Liberal Arts. I have been active in the disability rights movement for well over 20 years.

Author: Blane Beckwith

I was born on December 22, 1955, in a small Pennsylvania town named Corry. I was raised in Bear Lake, Pennsylvania. I graduated from Corry Area High School in 1973. After that, I attended Edinboro State College from 1977-79. I moved to Berkeley, California in 1980, in search of an independent life. In 2006, I graduated from Berkeley city College with two degrees, one in English and the other in Liberal Arts. I have been active in the disability rights movement for well over 20 years.